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Register Now orange button Monday, March 30, 2015
5:00 p.m. Reception
6:00 p.m. PROGRAM and Prize Presentation

Caspary Auditorium | The Rockefeller University
1230 York Avenue at East 66th Street | New York City

For details please contact Kathleen Gaffney at 212-327-8967 or kgaffney@rockefeller.edu.

About 2015 Prize Recipients

Ian Stewart, Ph.D., F.R.S., is Emeritus Professor of Mathematics at The University of Warwick. Dr. Stewart is an active research mathematician with more than 180 published papers. He has published over 80 books, including Mathematics of Life, Why Beauty Is Truth, What Shape Is a Snowflake?, and In Pursuit of the Unknown. He is also co-author of the bestselling series The Science of Discworld I, II, III, and IV and two science fiction novels, Wheelers and Heaven. Dr. Stewart’s Letters to a Young Mathematician won the Peano Prize and The Symmetry Perspective won the Balaguer Prize. A member of the Royal Society, he is also the recipient of the Royal Society’s Faraday Medal, the Gold Medal of the Institute for Mathematics and Its Applications, and the Public Understanding of Science Award from the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Dr. Stewart was educated at University of Cambridge and The University of Warwick.

Steven Strogatz, Ph.D., is the Jacob Gould Schurman Professor of Applied Mathematics at Cornell University. A renowned teacher and one of the world’s most highly cited mathematicians, Dr. Strogatz has blogged about math for The New York Times and has been a frequent guest on RadioLab. He is the author of Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos, Sync, The Calculus of Friendship, and The Joy of x. His honors include a Presidential Young Investigator Award, Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s highest teaching prize, a lifetime achievement award for the communication of mathematics to the general public, and membership in the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Dr. Strogatz studied at Princeton University, University of Cambridge, and Harvard University, and taught at MIT before moving to Cornell in 1994.

About the Lewis Thomas Prize

Throughout history, scientists and writers have sought to communicate with one another, despite barriers of language and process. The Rockefeller University Lewis Thomas Prize for Writing about Science honors the rare individual who bridges both worlds—whose voice and vision can tell us about science's aesthetic and philosophical dimensions, providing not merely new information but cause for reflection, even revelation. The Lewis Thomas Prize was established in 1993 by the trustees of The Rockefeller University. It was named after its first recipient, writer, educator, and physician-scientist Lewis Thomas, renowned author of The Lives of a Cell. Past recipients of the award include Oliver Sacks, Jared Diamond, and E.O. Wilson.

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